FOX News: ‘Xena’ star Lucy Lawless, a New Zealand native, sings tribute to mosque shooting victims

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares

One of New Zealand’s most widely known celebrities took to Twitter on Friday to deliver a heartfelt tribute to the victims of the horrific shootings at two mosques in Christchurch.

FOX News


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Reuters: World News: NZ mosque shootings toll rises to 50, authorities to begin releasing bodies

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares

The death toll in the New Zealand mosque shootings rose to 50 on Sunday after police found another victim at one of the mosques, and Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said bodies of those killed would begin to be released to families for burial.

Reuters: World News


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Voice of America: Cambodia Takes Aim at Critics Who Post on Facebook

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares

On the night of Jan. 16, Kol Sat could not locate her husband even after contacting everyone she thought might know the whereabouts of Kong Mas.

The next morning, her mother-in-law called with news: Police were questioning Kong Mas after arresting him the day before.

Kol Sat, a garment worker in Phnom Penh, told VOA her husband had accepted a friend’s invitation to have coffee only to be picked up by authorities around 9:30 a.m., just hours after Kong Mas arrived in Phnom Penh from…

Voice of America


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Reuters: World News: Argentina closes airspace to Boeing 737 MAX flights: state news agency

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares

Argentina has temporarily closed its airspace to flights using Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, following similar measures taken by other countries in the region after two fatal crashes involving the plane, the state-run news agency said on Saturday.

Reuters: World News


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

FOX News: Michael Jackson pieces reportedly pulled from Children’s Museum of Indianapolis following ‘Leaving Neverland’

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares

In the wake of the documentary “Leaving Neverland,” the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis reportedly decided to pull some of its memorabilia associated with Michael Jackson.

FOX News


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Reuters: World News: Anti-graft campaigner wins first round of Slovak presidential vote

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares

Zuzana Caputova, an anti-corruption campaigner with no experience in public office, won the first round of Slovakia’s presidential election on Saturday, setting up a tough clash with the ruling Smer party’s candidate.

Reuters: World News


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Academic in Cambridge Analytica data mining sues Facebook for defamation

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

By Anna Schecter

Aleksandr Kogan, the academic who mined Facebook for the data firm linked to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, Cambridge Analytica, filed a defamation suit against the social network Friday before the statute of limitations would have run out.

It was a Friday night exactly one year ago when Facebook “tried to get ahead of the Cambridge Analytica story,” in Kogan’s words, and issued a statement accusing him of deceiving the company when he developed his app in 2014, allowing him to collect Facebook data for Cambridge Analytica, the U.K.-based data firm that worked on Trump’s campaign.

Kogan told NBC News that he had been waiting on investigations by the Department of Justice, the Security and Exchange Commission and the Federal Election Commission of the Cambridge Analytica scandal to wrap up before filing, but the statute of limitations “forced our hand.” News of the lawsuit was first reported by the New York Times.

“Certainly my preference was to not file before the government investigations had concluded. That’s why we didn’t file this thing six months ago. We had no choice but to file Friday,” Kogan said Saturday in a phone interview.

Kogan, who currently works at a tech firm in Buffalo, New York, has maintained for months that his app that mined Facebook user profile data and the data of friends who downloaded his app was standard operating procedure for hundreds if not thousands of apps.

He has told NBC News that he had a working relationship with Facebook until the Cambridge Analytica scandal brought bad press to the company.

“This is a frivolous lawsuit from someone who recklessly violated our policies and put people’s data at risk,” Facebook spokesman Andy Stone said Saturday.

Kogan’s lawyer, Steven Cohen, said Facebook found “a convenient scapegoat” in Kogan.

“They accused him of being a liar and a fraud and they knew that wasn’t the truth and that’s the standard for defamation for a public person,” Cohen said. “Alex Kogan was clearly not a public figure, rather he was thrust into the limelight by Facebook’s defamation.”

Cohen said Facebook strategically referred to Kogan as a “Russian American” in its statement.

“They were reacting to all the negative publicity they posed for allowing Russian trolls to post fake news on Facebook and they found a convenient scapegoat in Alex Kogan.”

Kogan says he gave Facebook the terms of service of his app, and he gave every user the terms of service, and he has acknowledged in past interviews that few people read the fine print, and terms of service should be more user friendly.

“He did not deceive Facebook. He complied with what they told him to comply with,” Cohen said. “In the meantime, he has lost jobs, investors, consulting agreements and his good name. We want nothing more than to put this in front of a jury.”

Anna Schecter is a producer for the investigations unit of NBC News.


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Facebook Accused Of Cambridge Analytica ‘Cover-up’ As Criminal Prosecutors Investigate

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

The worst week in Facebook’s history showed no signs of letting up this weekend, with fresh accusations in the Observer of an executive-level cover-up of the company’s involvement in Cambridge Analytica’s data harvesting as well as news that the academic behind the scheme, Aleksandr Kogan, is suing the social media giant for defamation, for faking ignorance and for using him as a scapegoat when they were aware of events all along.

In the last week, the company has suffered its largest technical outage, endured revelations of a grand jury investigation in New York into the trading of should-be private user data with other technology companies, witnessed the tragic right-wing shooting in New Zealand live-streamed on its network, overseen the departures of chief product officer Chris Cox and head of WhatsApp Chris Daniels and caused a major own-goal by removing presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s campaign ads after she announced a proposal to break up the company.

Some week, even for Facebook. And there’s still the likelihood of that multi-billion-dollar FTC fine to come.

As I wrote on Thursday, the super-outage coinciding with headlines of a New York grand jury investigation is an unfortunate coincidence, but an apt one. The omens for regulation of social media’s apparent license to roam freely around the world and across billions of users are now there for all to see.

The Cambridge Analytica scandal, “the story of how whistleblower Christopher Wylie built media mogul Steve Bannon’s ‘psychological warfare tool’ by harvesting millions of people’s Facebook profiles”, marked a sea change for Facebook’s image. This weekend is the 12-month anniversary of that news, and it’s a year that seemingly keeps getting worse and from which Facebook and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg can’t find any respite.

The dominos begin falling

Facebook has consistently blamed Aleksandr Kogan for the Cambridge Analytica scandal, admitting their own culpability for lapse governance but not for knowing what was actually taking place. The academic used Facebook’s third-party data-sharing tools to invite 300,000 users to play games, which in turn opened up access to their 87 million friends. That is the data at the heart of the scandal. Data that was mined, allegedly with overseas (read Russian) interference to help shape electoral intentions in various campaigns, most notably Trump and Brexit.

Commenting on Aleksandr Kogan’s suit, his lawyer Steve Cohen said that “Alex did not lie, Alex was not a fraud, Alex did not deceive them, this was not a scam. Facebook knew exactly what this app was doing, or should have known. Facebook desperately needed a scapegoat, and Alex was their scapegoat.”

Kogan claims that Facebook sought to scapegoat him, despite being aware of what was going on throughout. Facebook has maintained that they were led to believe the data being harvested was for academic purposes only, and not for use as a data-driven exercise in political manipulation. When they found out the data had been passed on by Kogan, they sought its deletion and severed the relationship. This was long before the Trump campaign and its ‘Defeat Crooked Hilary’ videos on Facebook.

Responding to the latest news, a Facebook spokesperson dismissed Kogan’s lawsuit as “frivolous” and the academic as a person “who violated our policies and put people’s data at risk.”

But there’s more

On Saturday, the Observer went further than Kogan, claiming that Facebook executives had insight into what Cambridge Analytica was planning in 2016, as the firm began its work for the Trump campaign, facts that will be in evidence “as federal prosecutors investigate claims that the social media giant has covered up the extent of its relationship with the firm.”

The claims center on an alleged meeting between Facebook board member Marc Andreessen and the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Christopher Wylie, two years before he came forward to the press. “Individuals who attended the meeting with Wylie and Andreessen claim it was set up to learn what Cambridge Analytica was doing with Facebook’s data and how technologists could work to ‘fix’ it.”

A year ago, Zuckerberg claimed in a blog post that “last week we learned from the Guardian, the New York Times and Channel 4 that Cambridge Analytica may not have deleted the data as they had certified.” The latest allegations materially refute that claim.

The Observer article quotes ‘a Silicon Valley technologist’ with knowledge of the meeting saying: “There were people who were very concerned by the reports of what Cambridge Analytica was doing with data, and the meeting was set up to try and find out as much about the exploit as possible in order to figure out possible solutions. That’s why Wylie was invited. They wanted his knowledge. He was asked a lot of questions including about the company’s contacts with Russian entities.”

If the new allegations are true, it is “a hugely embarrassing revelation for Facebook, which was revealed last week to be the subject of a criminal investigation into whether it had covered up the extent of its involvement with Cambridge Analytica.”

The Observer reports that Facebook declined to answer any questions about their claims.

Regulation looms

Before the weekend, with news of a grand jury investigation into the casual sale of users’ privacy, it was clear that the case for regulation if not the break-up of the social media giants is now uncontestable.

A year ago, before these latest allegations came to light, the Observer commented: “What the Cambridge Analytica story exposed, by accident, from Facebook’s reaction in the months that followed, is the absolute power of the tech giants. Power and unaccountability that is the foundational platform on which populist authoritarians are rising to power all across the globe. Power and unaccountability that continues unchecked.”

The hard truth is that what was known 12-months ago only scratched the surface of what we have discovered since. The honeymoon we have all enjoyed with social media is now so badly tarnished it dominates the headlines week after week. And it has become a major political issue around the world, which will undoubtedly find its way into many more campaigns and manifestos that Senator Warren’s alone.

In making her case for the break-up of Big Tech, the Senator said “today’s big tech companies have too much power — too much power over our economy, our society, and our democracy. They’ve bulldozed competition, used our private information for profit, and tilted the playing field against everyone else. And in the process, they have hurt small businesses and stifled innovation.”

It’s hard to argue.


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Voice of America: Irish Pride, Dash of Politics, at St Patrick’s Parade

Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares

A new, troublesome topic hovered over the St. Patrick’s Day parade in New York this year: Britain’s failed Brexit deal with the European Union that could squeeze Ireland’s economy. 
  
But nothing could put a damper on the largest American celebration of Irish heritage on Saturday, with tens of thousands of marchers following a painted green line up Fifth Avenue for the six-hour procession.  
  
Spectator Kevin Coughlan, 27, wearing pants…

Voice of America


Spread the Knowledge
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    16
    Shares
  •  
    16
    Shares
  • 16
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •